Birds by Bertrando Campos


Pauraque (Hydropsalis albicollis)

The Common Pauraque is a distinctive nightjar of open woodland and scrub, including around human habitation. It is very long-tailed, with extensive white in the rectrices and bold white bands across the wings. The female has much more restricted white patches, but can still be identified by the long tail, well-defined ear patch, and lack of a nuchal collar. The distinctive call of the pauraque is a burry, rising-falling wheeeuu and is a characteristic sound of dusk and dawn in the Neotropics. This species is also commonly encountered on roads at night, when the light reflected by its eyes can be seen from some distance. From its perch on the ground, it can be observed sallying after flying insects low overhead. The Common Pauraque occurs from Texas south through Central and South America to northern Argentina.

Commom Potoo

Mãe-da-lua (Nyctibius griseus). The Common Potoo is a large nocturnal bird of lowland forests and forest edges of southern Central America and central and northern South America. During the day, Common Potoos usually roost on snags, exposed branches or fenceposts, where their disruptive coloration helps them remain avoid detection. They forage at night by sallying from exposed perches to catch flying insects. Common Potoos most frequently are detected by their amazingly haunting, descending song. They also can be located at night with a spotlight by searching for eyeshine at the tops of exposed perches. Common Potoos lay only a single egg, and do not build a nest; the egg is nestled on top of a stump or a broken branch, or in a slight depression on a large tree limb.

Baby Common Potoo

The Common Potoo is a large nocturnal bird of lowland forests and forest edges of southern Central America and central and northern South America. During the day, Common Potoos usually roost on snags, exposed branches or fenceposts, where their disruptive coloration helps them remain avoid detection. They forage at night by sallying from exposed perches to catch flying insects. Common Potoos most frequently are detected by their amazingly haunting, descending song. They also can be located at night with a spotlight by searching for eyeshine at the tops of exposed perches. Common Potoos lay only a single egg, and do not build a nest; the egg is nestled on top of a stump or a broken branch, or in a slight depression on a large tree limb.

Common Potoo (Nyctibius griseus)

The Common Potoo is a large nocturnal bird of lowland forests and forest edges of southern Central America and central and northern South America. During the day, Common Potoos usually roost on snags, exposed branches or fenceposts, where their disruptive coloration helps them remain avoid detection. They forage at night by sallying from exposed perches to catch flying insects. Common Potoos most frequently are detected by their amazingly haunting, descending song. They also can be located at night with a spotlight by searching for eyeshine at the tops of exposed perches. Common Potoos lay only a single egg, and do not build a nest; the egg is nestled on top of a stump or a broken branch, or in a slight depression on a large tree limb.

Common Potoo (Nyctibius griseus)

The Common Potoo is a large nocturnal bird of lowland forests and forest edges of southern Central America and central and northern South America. During the day, Common Potoos usually roost on snags, exposed branches or fenceposts, where their disruptive coloration helps them remain avoid detection. They forage at night by sallying from exposed perches to catch flying insects. Common Potoos most frequently are detected by their amazingly haunting, descending song. They also can be located at night with a spotlight by searching for eyeshine at the tops of exposed perches. Common Potoos lay only a single egg, and do not build a nest; the egg is nestled on top of a stump or a broken branch, or in a slight depression on a large tree limb.